Intern with the MINI ART MUSEUM – SUMMER 2016

mini summer internship

SUMMER 2016
INTERNSHIP ANNOUNCEMENT

DEADLINE: WEDNESDAY, MAY 4, 2016

ABOUT the MINI ART MUSEUM
spare parts founded its MINI ART MUSEUM in 2013 to bring the fine arts museum experience to schools & the community (from ages 6 through adult). The MINI ART MUSEUM exhibits tiny original works of art created by invited artists for themed & curated exhibitions.

MINI ART MUSEUM Awards

-CONTEMPORARY ART MONTH, 2015 — Through the Looking Glass Award for Bending Perceptions: spare parts MINI ART MUSEUM presents “Cabinet of Curiosities” curated by Claudia Zapata.
-SAN ANTONIO MAGAZINE, 2015 — spare parts MINI ART MUSEUM: Best Program Introducing Youth to the Art World.
-CONTEMPORARY ART MONTH, 2014 — Through the Looking Glass Award for Bending Perceptions: spare parts MINI ART MUSEUM presents Lady Base Gallery: “Short Stories.”

To learn more visit: sparepartstudio.org/mini-art-museum/. We’re also on Facebook & Instagram!

ABOUT the INTERNSHIP
The spare parts MINI ART MUSEUM internship is an unpaid summer opportunity that begins in June & runs through early August (minimum 50 hours). The intern directly reports to MINI ART MUSEUM Directors & Founders Mary E. Cantú & Gabriela Santiago & works closely with artists, volunteers & partnering San Antonio organizations.

The ideal candidate is familiar with utilizing social media, has exceptional verbal/written communication skills & is a strong creative & critical thinker. She/he will help archive the Museum’s growing permanent collection, research & collect data for grant opportunities & assist with daily organizational operations.

APPLY
Interested candidates should submit a cover letter, resume & contact information for 2 references. Email your application in .PDF format & ATTN: Mary E. Cantú to sparepartstudio@gmail.com  by Wednesday, May 4, 2016 at 5pm. Incoming High School Seniors, Undergraduate & Graduate Students are invited to apply. All applicants will be contacted by Friday, May 20, 2016.

Moving Painting—the art of the swing

Imagine lying on your belly in a big fabric swing, kind of like swinging like Batman as a kid. With a non-traditional painting utensil—think silk flowers, squishy ball, hand broom, even a flip flop rubber sandal—dipped in paint. Your educator/facilitator gently pushes you over across an area of canvases collected from thrift stores to freely apply marks. Slinging, flinging, dribbling and dabbing—you’re creating a masterpiece like no other.

sacurrentMOVINGPAINTING_begin

Moving Painting is a cross-disciplinary performance and visual art experience designed by spare parts which debuted at the contemporary arts showcase event Luminaria 2015.  “The concept for Moving Painting percolated in my thoughts for some time before finally sharing it earlier this year with Gabriela Santiago and Roberta Hassele,” said Mary Cantú, Founder and Director of spare parts. “I was hesitant to talk about it because it was a wacky idea and wasn’t sure it would be accepted.”

sacurrentMOVINGPAINTING__But spare parts advisory board members Santiago and Carla Berryman (who helped write the proposal) have no problem with not only accepting, but embracing, the non-traditional art experience. Currently serving as Director/Co-Chair Contemporary Art Month San Antonio, Hassele joined the team to  bring her considerable experience and talents to the project. The result is the creation of a unique, free-form artistic experience which speaks to children and adults alike.

It challenges participants, as well as audience to rethink artistic expression.

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Captured comments from Moving Painting participants.

Luminaria looked at the proposal and noticed our performance needed to hang from a secure structure. Initial plans included the installation of scaffolding. Fortunately, CrossFit Mind Body Soul, a business on this year’s Luminaria footprint, was open to hosting Moving Painting. “Our experience was very positive with Andrew Lilly and the entire CrossFit staff, “states Cantú. Lilly described Moving Painting as “unique because you’re constantly moving around the paintings seeing everything from a different angle/perspective instead just staring at it straight up and down as it sits still in front of you.”

Kinetic, creative, interactive, colorful, wacky and fun

It’s nostalgic; it reminds people of swinging on the playground. It’s open ended: you can paint as much or as little as you want; you can experiment with colors and mark making.

“I would love to see Moving Painting installed in the middle of huge closed arena like the Alamodome; at The DoSeum, out in a grand public place like Market Square; at a venue such as Brick at Blue Star,” said Hassele. “Or, at parks, birthday parties, in museums, back at Crossfit MBS, team-building events for businesses/organizations, in your backyard, Fiesta, Siclovia, and Chalk It Up (replace paint for chalk),” added Cantú. “There are endless possibilities.”

Nina Hassele (l) & Mary Cantu (r)
Roberta Hassele (l) & Mary Cantu (r)

Good news! The Moving Painting experience is for hire. If you are interested in the bringing this unique fun to your next event. Contact sparepartstudio@gmail.com.

Luminaria: Established in 2008, Luminaria is a contemporary arts festival unique to San Antonio. The two-night event is a celebration of the arts presenting new works by performance, literary and visual artists.

 

 

Creative Reuse—getting your art & craft on

The concept of creative reuse aka upcycling, remaking or repurposing is not new.  According to Grant Johnson, author of “1000 Ideas for Creative Reuse: Remake, Restyle, Recycle, Renew,” materials reuse has been around since medieval scribes scraped off and reused parchments, and the ancient Greeks melted down older bronze statues to make newer versions. Creative reuse, in its current incarnation, combines artistic expression with ecological responsibility served with a side of thrift.

In the hierarchy of what to do with our stuff, reduce should be the first action—quit buying so much stuff! Reduce means choosing to use or purchase things with care to reduce the amount of waste generated.

reuse pyramid_small

Reuse is different from recycling, where the products are broken down treuse 1o its component parts and re-manufactured into new products. Creative reuse is also different from conventional reuse, where the product is used in its original purpose again.

Recycle means the conversion of a waste to form a new product.

Disposal is the magical ‘disappearance’ of all other trash to the landfill where most of it never, ever really goes away.

 

So have we piqued your interest to learn more about creative reuse? Wondering how to get started? The San Antonio Public Library is always a good resource for ideas and inspiration. Here’s a list of books complied by one of their helpful librarians.

“Modern upcycling: a user-friendly guide to inspiring and repurposed handicrafts for a trendy home”

“Reclaimed textiles: techniques for paper, stitch, plastic and mixed media”

“Vintage reuse 2made modern: transforming timeworn textiles into treasured heirlooms”

“Creative recycling in embroidery”

“The Salvage Sisters’ guide to finding style in the street and inspiration in the attic”

“Trash formations east”Johnson book

Quoted in the first paragraph, Grant Johnson’s book is full of marvelous art work pictures with corresponding materials list.

Several other hands-on avenues are also available. Leading the charge in San Antonio for creative reuse is spare parts founded by Mary Elizabeth Cantu in 2010. spare parts offers cultural and environmental sustainability, affordability and accessibility to the arts through education. A large variety of workshops and projects at schools and community wide-events are held throughout the year. Attending an event or volunteering with the organization can impart insights and instructions.creative reuse art table

In addition there are many “maker” organizations and events popping up around town. The ‘maker culture’ invites people of all ages to be creative in a plethora of venues including—technology, DIY projects, artistic expression. Many of these projects are creative reuse. “Make San Antonio a creative hub for makers of all ages” is a good example.

Argentinian artist Elisa Insua calls her creative reuse art “immortalizing meaningless trash into works of art.” We agree.Elisa_Insua_-_WS_-_Herospace